Historical Sites in the Northeast Georgia Mountains

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Blood Mountain - Elevation 4458 ft. - Chattahoochee National Forest

In Cherokee mythology the mountain was one of the homes of the Nunnehi or Immortals, the "People Who Live Anywhere," a race of Spirit People who lived in great townhouses in the highlands of Old Cherokee County. One of these mythical townhouses stood near Lake Trahlyta. As a friendly people, they often brought lost hunters and wanderers to their townhouses for rest and care before guiding them back to their homes. Before the coming of white settlers, the Creeks and Cherokees fought a disastrous and bloody battle in Slaughter Gap between Slaughter and Blood Mountain. (Georgia Historical Commission)

The Chattahoochee National Forest takes its name from the Chattahoochee River whose headwaters begin in the North Georgia mountains.[2] The River and the area were given the name by the English settlers who took the name from the Indians living here. The Cherokee and Creek Indians inhabited North Georgia. In one dialect of the Muskogean languages, Chatta means stone; ho chee, marked or flowered. These marked or flowered stones were in the Chattahoochee River at a settlement near Columbus, Georgia.

Historical Attractions — View or Print Historical Tour Map

Byron Herbert Reece Farm & Heritage Center-Visit the birthplace and land of inspiration of the renowned Appalachian poet and novelist, Byron Herbert Reece. Born in 1917, Reece produced an enduring body of poetry and fiction from the sounds and spirits of his north Georgia homeland. The Farm and Heritage Center allows you to step back in time to a simpler way of life. Tour the farm with the help of a self-guided brochure, walk around the farm in Hub Reece's footsteps, wander through the museum and browse the gift shop. www.byronherbertreecesociety.org

Historic Courthouse-Love architecture? Love history? Both elements come alive for you when you visit this Romanesque brick and granite courthouse built in 1899 on the square in downtown Blairsville. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, and recently restored, it's now a local history museum, cultural center, and summertime concert hall. 706-745-5493. www.unioncountyhistory.org

Mountain Life Museum-Explore the local history Mountain Life Museum, consisting of the Historic 1899 Courthouse, the 1906 Butt/Mock Home, the 1861 John Payne Cabin, the c. 1830 Duncan Cabin and a late 1800s Corn Crib. www.unioncountyhistory.org

Trackrock Archeological Area-Walk a mile in the moccasins of Native Americans within this two-acre area. View preserved petroglyphs of ancient native origin that were carved or pecked into soapstone boulders. You'll marvel at the variety of symbols made by hunters that represent Native American beliefs. Brasstown District Ranger Station - 706-745-6928 www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/conf/recarea/?recid=64871

Walasi Yi Center -Cherokee for "Frog Town", at the Walasi Yi Center you can immerse yourself in history at this historical stone structure built by 1937 and located in the Blood Mountain Archeological area. It is the only place where the 2,175-mile-long Appalachian Trail passes through a man-made structure. It is currently the first mail-drop available to northbound hikers that does not require one to leave the trail. Mountain Crossings at the Walasi-Yi Center, Inc. www.mountaincrossings.com